Aubade to the paralian

au·bade
ōˈbäd
noun
1. a poem or piece of music appropriate to the dawn or early morning.

Paralian
noun
1. A person who lives by the sea; specifically (in ancient Greece) a member of a people living on the coast near Athens in the 6th cent.
    “I brought you cereal because it’s the only thing I can’t burn”, she gently says, chuckling, as she hands me the ceramic bowl with fresh milk filled to the brim, almost spilling. I notice how she always uses my favorite bowl, the one we hand-painted during our weekly pottery class, years ago. In fact, that is where we first met seven years ago, when we first enrolled into university. 
    We have grown so much since we first met. Now, we live in our beautiful little home which overlooks the ocean, married, uncaring of what others have to say about our relationship. Even our parents believe we ruin the sancitity of a typical, conventional marriage. After all, I married my best friend and we both happen to be women. 
This home is so important to us. It is a modest symbol of our matrimony; strong, unmoving and sturdy. 
    We both are avid fans of the sea. I used to be a competitive swimmer when I was younger and she is so fond of what the sea holds that she is now a marine biologist. The sea holds so many of our memories. Our first date was by the sea, birthdays were celebrated by the sea, she proposed to me by the sea, and of course, we got married on this very beach we live on. 
    “Aren’t we so lucky?”, she leaned her head on my shoulders as we sat on the warm sand, watching the sun set like we do every evening. Her voice is like music to my ears. We are paralians and she is my aubade. 
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